The Passing of A Dinner Companion | Pictures | Food Newsie

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The Passing of A Dinner Companion

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The Passing of A Dinner Companion

We really shared some great times; for almost exactly two years, the Canon SD1400 IS soldiered on through pockets, falls on the table, brushes with death by gravy and numerous foodie events that never made it to post. The pocket-sized camera from the ELPH family of prosumer digital point and shoots required little experience and came in at the two-hundred dollar mark recommended to help ensure better quality.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

At just two days old, the SD1400 IS had its first Christmas in 2010 displaying an aptitude for snapping vibrant colors and excellent Macro close ups.

Its ability to capture Macro shots close-up brought the lens within one and-a-half inches of some subjects. At just two days old, the SD1400 IS had its first Christmas in 2010 recording forever a perfect roast and foodie friend M.E. simultaneously getting and blessing food from the holiday feast spread before us.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

Guided professionally with an ease provided by some instrucatables, tasters were challenged to distinguish cheap from affordable from high-end wines. Still timid, the Canon coyed away from low light situations until This Author became a little more familiar with its settings and likely results.

The day after Christmas, the little pocket ELPH attended its first wine tasting hosted and attended by gracious fellow food bloggers in tow with their own cameras. Shrouded in secrecy, four bottles vied for the attention of tasters. Guided professionally with an ease provided by some instrucatables, tasters were challenged to distinguish cheap from affordable from high-end wines. Food was paired, fruit desserts served and one unlucky cat mewed with uncertainty once strapped in to a Santa hat.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

As Chloe, the reluctant icon of Christmas shows in this still from a video, the fidelity of whites and blacks, the grays in between and clarity of details captured is enviable. Noise is visible, but for $200 price point, fully acceptable.

Immediately, the little camera revealed its power to create lovely black and white video at 720 HD resolutions. As Chloe, the reluctant icon of Christmas shows in this still from a video, the fidelity of whites and blacks, the grays in between and clarity of details captured is enviable. Small cameras “invent” pixels to fill the demand for image output that’s 1280 by 720 pixels; inventing more so for video. The result is noise, near-color or near-value static that buzzes softly through the image.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

The Canon SD1400 IS failed in trials set up to test it as a camera for capturing two or more images that software would use to generate HDR, Tone Mapped images. With no AEB Automatic Exposure Braket setting, the photographer must re-dial exposure settings by stabbing menu buttons between each image. The result even with a steady tripod is tilt and time making uality HDR imagery nearly impossible. It's first stop in 2011 was J.Giffords in Virginia where the low prices seem at odds with both the great service and superior dining environment. Despite not availing itself to HDR imagery, the colors were crisp and the signal to noise ratio was low.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

The SD1400 IS became a constant companion much to the delight of friends who would craft tastings just to have it attend. It was both highly welcomed and comes to you via this post as highly recommended as Catoctin Creek's Roundstone Rye is. It's a smooth, classy whiskey up high, alone in the category of rye.

As 2011 wore on into 2012, the camera snapped the souls of friends and desserts from Mon Ami Gabi. Celebrations of food and drink were prepared just for its arrival – venison and Catoctin Creek Distilling Company’s whiskey with more friends who had soul to spare. Bubbles at the rim of pint glasses became a favorite subject of the little SD1400. All the while, both its black and white settings and neutral color settings continued to deliver satisfactory results.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

It sought out dynamically lit scenes and its Spot Meter setting wasn't easily fooled by overhead lighting, bright subjects or dark subjects. Its rapid shutter release could manage up to three images a second if the lighting conditions didn't require too long an exposure. It attended many chats over coffee and saw the rise of the luxury coffee store front as baristas and importers sought to elevate the status of a brew. Even as its sensor began to wane with age and wear, it recorded the hay day of egg deliveries noting in accurate brilliance the different hues of chicken and duck eggs.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

As the bumps and bruises continued to come, the lens gave up zooming in on subjects in favor of travelling around the country waiting in lines for artisan foods created on site from nearby producers. It consumed towering sandwiches and denied strong back-lighting blooms and wash outs like a camera costing twice as much. Despite its advancing age, it kept to its first duty, watching over mad experiments and documenting strange things like the center stems of boiled Yucca.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

At almost two years old and having surpassed six-thousand images, it marched forward and followed into the new mission of Eating Hard. In an effort to close the gap between consumer and food production, the camera learned how to make its own sausage. It was pursued by Raul, a small, black dog at a Bacon-themed dinner.

Despite the ELPH showing terrible signs of age, it was invited along to pick-up a new bee hive, two mediums, no foundation. The little camera won’t get to see the three and-a-half pound ball of bees that take residence in the Spring, but perhaps that’s for the best.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

Near the end, the Canon SD1400 IS began vignetting images even when the light was fine. The sensor received more noise from the electronics surrounding it. Dots of purple and green became more vivid in dark areas. The focus motor was slower. The camera clicked and snapped as it powered on. Though it didn't make midnight, its final renderings were a comfort to it: A New Year's Eve Lobster Boil surrounded by foodies and friends, and me.

It is with great gravity and regret that we inform you that near midnight, December 31st, 2012, the mid-range priced member of the ELPH family of Canon pocket shooters succumbed to ailments of age and haphazard use. Witnessing only happy occasions, the camera leaves behind a Canon 50D, HTC One X mobile phone camera, a plastic Diana F+ medium format analog camera, and freshly pulled from the piles of boxes at FoodNewsie Central, an authentic Polaroid Land Camera 103 from 1968.

The Passing of A Dinner Companion

Instagram be damned. There will be pictures. For the next six months, This Author's going to food blog like it's 1971 when the engines were V8's, we'd just kissed the moon, Kissed The Sky and A Clockwork Orange and THX 1138 just freaked everyone out.

1 Responses to "The Passing of A Dinner Companion"

Farmrgirl says:

RIP tiny Elph.

You’re remembered as the chronicler of smiles, laughter, and tasty treats. Emerging from a pocket in a flash to focus on what’s important: capture the good times, develop from the negatives, and if it goes wrong…take another shot. As Paul Simon said in his song ‘Kodachrome’, you made us think all the world’s a sunny day.

In your honor, Food Newsie & Co. will spend time basking in ‘the retro’ and reflecting in film.

Fondly not forgotten,

~Farmrgirl

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